Optimizing non-invasive radiofrequency hyperthermia treatment for improving drug delivery in 4T1 mouse breast cancer model

Matthew J. Ware, Martyna Krzykawska-Serda, Jason Chak-Shing Ho, Jared Newton, Sarah Suki, Justin Law, Lam Nguyen, Vazrik Keshishian, Maciej Serda, Kimberly Taylor, Steven A. Curley, Stuart J. Corr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Interactions of high-frequency radio waves (RF) with biological tissues are currently being investigated as a therapeutic platform for non-invasive cancer hyperthermia therapy. RF delivers thermal energy into tissues, which increases intra-tumoral drug perfusion and blood-flow. Herein, we describe an optical-based method to optimize the short-term treatment schedules of drug and hyperthermia administration in a 4T1 breast cancer model via RF, with the aim of maximizing drug localization and homogenous distribution within the tumor microenvironment. This method, based on the analysis of fluorescent dyes localized into the tumor, is more time, cost and resource efficient, when compared to current analytical methods for tumor-targeting drug analysis such as HPLC and LC-MS. Alexa-Albumin 647 nm fluorphore was chosen as a surrogate for nab-paclitaxel based on its similar molecular weight and albumin driven pharmacokinetics. We found that RF hyperthermia induced a 30-40% increase in Alexa-Albumin into the tumor micro-environment 24 h after treatment when compared to non-heat treated mice. Additionally, we showed that the RF method of delivering hyperthermia to tumors was more localized and uniform across the tumor mass when compared to other methods of heating. Lastly, we provided insight into some of the factors that influence the delivery of RF hyperthermia to tumors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number43961
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 13 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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