Opioid-Sparing Effect of Liposomal Bupivacaine and Intravenous Acetaminophen in Colorectal Surgery

Elsie Rizk, Eric M Haas, Joshua T Swan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: This study evaluated the opioid-sparing effect of liposomal bupivacaine and intravenous acetaminophen in colorectal surgery. Materials and methods: This study was a retrospective, 2 × 2 factorial cohort conducted at an academic medical center from May 2016 to February 2018. Patients undergoing open or minimally invasive colorectal resection were included. Exclusion criteria were age <18 y, surgery after second hospital day, ostomy, and allergy to acetaminophen, opioids, or bupivacaine. Intraoperative liposomal bupivacaine and intravenous acetaminophen administration within 18 h after surgery were evaluated. The primary outcome was intravenous morphine milligram equivalents administered within 24 h after surgery. A linear regression model adjusted for American Society of Anesthesiologists score, enhanced recovery after surgery management, open surgery, opioid use before surgery, and height was used for the primary analysis. Results: Among 486 included patients, 193 received both liposomal bupivacaine and intravenous acetaminophen, 93 received liposomal bupivacaine only, 104 received intravenous acetaminophen only, and 96 did not receive either. On average, patients received 21 (SD = 31) morphine equivalents over 24 h. Intraoperative liposomal bupivacaine was associated with a reduction of morphine equivalents (adjusted change −11, 95% CI −17 to −6), but intravenous acetaminophen was not (2, 95% CI −3 to 7). Intraoperative liposomal bupivacaine was associated with a reduction of length of stay (adjusted change = −1.2 d, 95% CI −2.1 to −0.3), but intravenous acetaminophen was not (adjusted change = 1.5 d, 95% CI 0.7 to 2.2). Conclusions: Liposomal bupivacaine was associated with a significant reduction of opioid use within 24 h after colorectal surgery, but intravenous acetaminophen was not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalThe Journal of surgical research
Early online dateOct 10 2020
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - Oct 10 2020

Keywords

  • Colorectal surgery
  • Enhanced recovery after surgery
  • Intravenous acetaminophen
  • Liposomal bupivacaine
  • Opioids
  • Pain management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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