Nonspecific binding removal with ultrasonic microdevices

Grant D. Meyer, Jose Moran-Mirabal, Darren W. Branch, Harold G. Craighead

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Protein microarrays are high information density bioassays that, if accurate, provide information valuable in early disease diagnosis and biodefense applications. While elegant patterning methods exist, diagnostic validity is crippled by nonspecific binding and device fouling. Nonspecifically bound biomolecules create false signal, block sensor receptors, and foul detectors. As biomarker detection (electrochemical, gravimetric or optical) is pushed to lower levels, nonspecific binding becomes increasingly problematic. Commonly, nonspecific binding is mitigated by surfactant addition or excessive, repeated washing. These additional steps add complexity to devices promised to be portable, robust, simple and accurate. Using quartz crystal resonators, low affinity proteins were removed from protein microarrays, improving protein spot uniformity and signal reproducibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMicro Total Analysis Systems - Proceedings of MicroTAS 2005 Conference
Subtitle of host publication9th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences
PublisherTransducer Research Foundation
Pages19-21
Number of pages3
Volume1
ISBN (Print)0974361119, 9780974361116
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Event9th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2005 - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Oct 9 2005Oct 13 2005

Other

Other9th International Conference on Miniaturized Systems for Chemistry and Life Sciences, MicroTAS 2005
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period10/9/0510/13/05

Keywords

  • Microarrays
  • Nonspecific binding
  • Proteins
  • Ultrasonic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Bioengineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Nonspecific binding removal with ultrasonic microdevices'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this