Non-specific factor enhancement of human in vitro antigen-dependent antibody synthesis: Role of B cell activation and T cell help

Malcolm Brenner, M. E. North, H. R. Chadda, J. Farrant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lectin-free supernatants obtained from PWM-stimulated lymphocytes, enable B cells to proliferate and secrete immunoglobulin. Both functions are augmented by the addition of irradiated T cells. In the presence of antigen, these supernatants also enhance specific anti-tetanus toxoid antibody production. The components of the supernatant responsible for these activities have a molecular weight between 30,000 and 60,000, and have the characteristics of non-specific factors: they are genetically unrestricted, and do not bind to either antigen or anti-DR affinity columns. There is no evidence that the partial T dependency of these factors is an indication that their target is a T cell. Instead, T cells appear necessary to move the B cell into a state of activation in which it becomes responsive to the factor. Alternative activation signals such as Staph. A. Cowan can substitute for T cell help in the proliferative response, but not for immunoglobulin or antibody synthesis. The implications of these results for the approaches used to detect and classify B cell growth factors are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)783-791
Number of pages9
JournalImmunology
Volume51
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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