Next-generation sequencing of a cohort of pulmonary large cell carcinomas reclassified by world health organization 2015 criteria

Brandon R. Driver, Bryce P. Portier, Dina R. Mody, Michael Deavers, Eric H. Bernicker, Min P. Kim, Bin S. Teh, Jose F. Santacruz, Lisa Kopas, Reginald F. Munden, Philip T. Cagle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context.-The classification of pulmonary large cell carcinoma has undergone a major revision with the recent World Health Organization (WHO) 2015 Classification. Many large cell carcinomas are now reassigned to either adenocarcinoma with solid pattern or nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma based on immunopositivity for adenocarcinoma markers or squamous cell carcinoma markers, respectively. Large cell carcinomas that are negative for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma immunomarkers are now classified as large cell carcinoma with null immunohistochemical features (LCC-N). Although a few studies investigated the mutation profile of large cell carcinomas grouped by immunostain profile before the publication of the new WHO classification, investigation of tumors previously diagnosed as large cell carcinoma and reclassified according to the 2015 WHO classification has not, to our knowledge, been reported. Objective.-To determine the mutation profiles of pulmonary large cell carcinomas reclassified by WHO 2015 criteria. Design.-Archival cases of non-small cell lung carcinoma with large cell carcinoma morphology (n = 17) were reclassified according to 2015 WHO criteria. To determine mutation profile, we employed Ion Torrent (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, California)-based next-generation sequencing (50 genes; more than 2800 mutations) in addition to real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for ALK translocation detection. Results.-Two of 17 cases (12%) were reclassified as LCC-N, and both had mutations-BRAF D594N in one case and KRAS G12C in the other case. Seven of 17 cases (41%) were reclassified in the adenocarcinoma with solid pattern group, which showed one KRAS G12C and one EGFR E709K + G719C double mutation in addition to mutations in TP53. Eight of 17 cases (47%) were reclassified in the nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma group, which showed mutations in PIK3CA, CDKN2A, and TP53. No ALK translocations or amplifications were detected. Conclusions.-The adenocarcinoma with solid pattern group showed mutations typical of adenocarcinoma, whereas the nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma group showed mutations typical of squamous cell carcinoma. Both LCC-N cases had mutations associated with adenocarcinoma, supporting the hypothesis that LCC-N is related to adenocarcinoma.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)312-317
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
Volume140
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Medical Laboratory Technology

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