Neurogenic bladder dysfunction does not correlate with astrocyte and microglia activation produced by graded force in a contusion-induced spinal cord injury

Alvaro Munoz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rodent models for the study of neurogenic bladder dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI) are difficult to standardize, particularly when evaluating the specific contribution of the SCI to end-organ function. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of bladder dysfunction associated with a highly reproducible, contusion-induced SCI in female rats. An infinite horizon impactor was used to create a contusion SCI with a magnitude of either 100 or 150 kDyne at the T8/T9 thoracic region of female Sprague-Dawley rats. Locomotor function, and the presence of astrocytes (positive regions for Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein) and microglia (positive cells for the integrin CD11b) at the SCI site were determined at four weeks after SCI. Similarly, cystometric properties were characterized in urethane anesthetized rats at four weeks post-SCI. The significant increases in astrocyte and microglia in the T8/T9 region in all of the SCI animals did not correlate with locomotor impairment or bladder dysfunction. After performing the cystometric studies substantial differences were found in both SCI groups when compared to intact animals, specifically a high frequency of non-voiding contractions, different durations for intraluminal pressure-high frequency oscillations, intercontractile intervals, impaired micturition volumes, and estimated voiding efficiency. These results suggest that a contusion SCI can increase microglia and astrocyte activation without a strong association with bladder dysfunction. The present study will be important for precise considerations about correlating the intensity of an SCI with impairment outcomes at both locomotor or organ function levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)18-24
Number of pages7
JournalBrain Research Bulletin
Volume131
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2017

Keywords

  • Astrocytes
  • Cystometry
  • Microglia
  • Neurogenic bladder dysfunction
  • Spinal cord injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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