Nanomedicine safety in preclinical and clinical development: focus on idiosyncratic injection/infusion reactions

Seyed Moein Moghimi

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Injection/infusion reactions to nanopharmaceuticals (and particulate drug carriers) are idiosyncratic and well documented. The molecular basis of nanoparticle-mediated injection reactions is debatable, with two hypotheses as front-runners. The first is complement-activation-related ‘pseudoallergy’ where a causal role for nanoparticle-mediated complement activation in injection/infusion reactions is considered. However, the second hypothesis (the rapid phagocytic response hypothesis) states a transitional link from robust clearance of nanoparticles (NPs) from the blood by strategically placed responsive macrophages to adverse hemodynamic and cardiopulmonary reactions, regardless of complement activation. Here, I critically examine and discuss these hypotheses. Current experimentally derived evidence appears to be more in support of the rapid phagocytic response hypothesis than of the ‘pseudoallergy’ hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1034-1042
Number of pages9
JournalDrug Discovery Today
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Drug Discovery

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