MTHFR gene mutations correlate with white matter disease burden and predict cerebrovascular disease and dementia

Christian E. Cajavilca, Rajan R. Gadhia, Gustavo C. Román

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The incidence of dementia is on the rise and expected to continue to increase in the foreseeable future. Two of the most common subtypes of dementia are Alzheimer’s subtype and vascular dementia. Hyperhomocysteinemia has been shown to serve as a risk factor for dementia due to an associated blood-brain barrier dysfunction and subsequent small-vessel disease pathology. There are varying causes for hyperhomocysteinemia, including genetic and dietary, among others. We highlight the importance of identifying hyperhomocysteinemia as a potential etiologic and therapeutic target for the most common subtypes of dementia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number211
JournalBrain Sciences
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

Keywords

  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Dementia
  • Homocysteine
  • MTHFR gene

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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