Molecular epidemiology of coagulase-negative staphylococcus blood isolates from neonates with persistent bacteremia and children with central venous catheter infections

Tina Q. Tan, James M. Musser, Robert J. Shulman, Edward Mason, Donald H. Mahoney, Sheldon Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was used to genetically characterize sequential isolates of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CONS) from 3 neonates with persistent bacteremia and organisms cultured from several sites in 23 children with presumed catheter-related sepsis (CRS). For 2 of 3 neonates and 21 (91%) of 23 of the patients with presumed CRS, the same CONS clone was isolated from multiple consecutive blood cultures (mean, 7.3 isolates; range, 3-19). For the 23 children with presumed CRS, 7 (30%) had catheter hub (CH) and 7 (30%) had catheter exit site (CES) cultures positive for CONS; cultures from 3 of these patients (from both CH and CES) grew CONS. Genetic analysis of isolates recovered from the CH and peripheral and central venous catheter blood cultures of all 7 patients revealed clonal identity of the strain grown from all sites. In contrast, only 4 (57%) of 7 of the CONS isolates from the CES were the same clone as that isolated from the blood. These data suggest that repetitive isolation of CONS during the course of CRS is due to ongoing bacteremia, not culture contamination with distinct CONS isolates. The results also are consistent with the hypothesis that the CH is a more likely site of initial colonization by CONS than the exit site in patients with CRS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1393-1397
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume169
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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