MINIMALLY INVASIVE TREATMENT OF IDIOPATHIC SYRINGOMYELIA USING MYRINGOTOMY T-TUBES: A CASE REPORT AND TECHNICAL NOTE

Domagoj Jugović, Roman Bošnjak, Krešimir Rotim, Günther C. Feigl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Syringomyelia is characterized by a fluid-filled cavity within the spinal cord. Expansion of the syrinx often results in the clinical course of progressive neurologic deficit. Surgery for syringomyelia generally aims to treat the underlying cause, if it is known. However, little is known about idiopathic syringomyelia, which requires specific management. In our paper, an alternative, minimally invasive treatment option for large symptomatic idiopathic cervicothoracic syrinx is described and discussed. We present a case of a 44-year-old male without a history of spinal cord trauma, infection, or other pathologic processes, who presented for thoracic pain. Due to progressive pain and left leg paresis, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed and revealed extensive septated syringomyelia from T5 to T7 and hydromyelia cranially. We applied minimally invasive technique for shunting the idiopathic syrinx into the subarachnoid space using two Richards modified myringotomy T-tubes. Postoperative MRI revealed significant decrease in the syrinx size and clinical six-month follow-up showed improvement of clinical symptoms. This minimally invasive treatment of syringomyelia was found to be an effective method for idiopathic septated syrinx, without evident underlying cause. However, long-term follow-up and more patients are necessary for definitive evaluation of this technique.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-182
Number of pages6
JournalActa clinica Croatica
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Keywords

  • Cerebrospinal fluid shunts
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Middle ear ventilation
  • Syringomyelia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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