Long-term results of coronary bypass surgery: Analysis of 1698 patients followed 15 to 20 years

G. M. Lawrie, G. C. Morris, N. Earle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Between 1968 and 1975, 1698 patients underwent coronary artery bypass with autogenous saphenous vein and were followed for up to 20 years. Age at operation was 53.9 ± 8.4 years, and 1485 were men (88%). Angina was present in 1637 patients (96%). There was single-vessel disease in 306 patients (18%), double-vessel in 642 (38%), triple-vessel in 550 patients (32%) and left main stenosis in 200 (12%). Preoperative left ventricular quality was good in 1185 (70%), poor in 508 (30%), and unknown in five patients. Survival at 20 years was as follows: for single-vessel disease, 40%; double-vessel, 26%; triple-vessel, 20%; and left main, 25%. At 20 years of follow-up, 67% of surviving patients were asymptomatic and 26% were improved. Antianginal drug therapy consisted of nitrates in 49% of patients and betablockers in 26%. Graft patency at 0 to 5 years was 633 of 780 grafts (81%); at 6 to 10 years, 415 of 606 grafts (68%); at 11 to 15 years, 271 of 449 grafts (60%); and at 16 to 20 years, 65 of 140 grafts (46%). Coronary bypass reoperation was performed in 324 patients (19%) and survival of these patients was 62% compared to 37% for nonreoperation patients (p < 0.05). Cox analysis demonstrated that the major determinants of survival related to age at operation, extent of coronary disease, quality of ventricle, history of stroke, and preoperative congestive heart failure. At 20 years of follow-up of this early experience with coronary bypass, 76% of surviving patients had one or more patent grafts and the probability of freedom from reoperation was 0.62.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)377-387
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume213
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Long-term results of coronary bypass surgery: Analysis of 1698 patients followed 15 to 20 years'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this