Abstract

Background: Renal allograft survival is negatively affected by the development of de novo posttransplant donor-specific antibodies (dnDSA). We sought to determine whether treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) could remove or reduce the intensity of dnDSA. Methods: A single-center study of 12 recipients with dnDSA and stable function who received IVIG 1 g/kg monthly for 6 months were compared with a contemporaneous cohort of 24 recipients with dnDSA who did not receive IVIG. Results: The median time to first dnDSA was 6 months (interquartile range [IQR], 1-12), and follow-up was 83 months (IQR, 58-94) posttransplant. Resolution of dnDSA occurred in 27% of IVIG vs 46% of control recipients (P = .48). Fifty-eight percent of recipients in both cohorts demonstrated a reduction in the intensity of the dominant DSA at last follow-up (P =1.0). A reduction in the number of dnDSAs occurred in 58% vs 62% of the IVIG and control cohorts, respectively (P = .81). Post-dnDSA, acute rejection occurred in 8% of the IVIG vs 42% in the control group (P = .06). Forty-two percent of IVIG-treated vs 49% of control recipients had a deterioration in function from first dnDSA until most recent follow-up (P = .81). Actuarial graft survivals were equivalent between groups. Conclusions: IVIG treatment of dnDSA in recipients with stable graft function had no impact on DSA clearance or MFI reduction, but this outcome may also be owing to sample size. Larger studies or alternate dosing regimens may be required to determine if there is any role for the use of IVIG as a treatment for dnDSA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1865-1871
Number of pages7
JournalTransplantation Proceedings
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Transplantation

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Long-Term Follow-Up of Renal Transplant Recipients Treated With IVIG for De Novo Donor-Specific Antibodies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this