Long-term efficacy of bivalirudin and provisional glycoprotein IIb/IIIa blockade vs heparin and planned glycoprotein IIb/IIIa blockade during percutaneous coronary revascularization: REPLACE-2 randomized trial

A. Michael Lincoff, Neal S. Kleiman, Dean J. Kereiakes, Frederick Feit, John A. Bittl, J. Daniel Jackman, Ian J. Sarembock, David J. Cohen, Douglas Spriggs, Ramin Ebrahimi, Gadi Keren, Jeffrey Carr, Eric A. Cohen, Amadeo Betriu, Walter Desmet, Wolfgang Rutsch, Robert G. Wilcox, Pim J. De Feyter, Alec Vahanian, Eric J. Topol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

355 Scopus citations

Abstract

Context: In the Randomized Evaluation in PCI Linking Angiomax to Reduced Clinical Events (REPLACE)-2 trial, bivalirudin with provisional glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (Gp IIb/ IIIa) inhibition was found to be noninferior to heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa blockade in the prevention of acute ischemic end points and was associated with significantly less bleeding by 30 days after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Objective: To determine whether the efficacy of bivalirudin remains comparable with that of heparin plus Gp IIb/IIIa blockade over 6 months and 1 year. Design, Setting, and Participants: Follow-up study to 1 year of a randomized, double-blind trial conducted among 6010 patients undergoing urgent or elective PCI at 233 community or referral hospitals in 9 countries from October 2001 through August 2002. Interventions: Patients were randomly assigned to receive intravenously bivalirudin (0.75 mg/kg bolus, 1.75 mg/kg per hour for the duration of PCI), with provisional Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition, or to receive heparin (65 U/kg bolus), with planned Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition (abciximab or eptifibatide). Both groups received daily aspirin and a thienopyridine for at least 30 days after PCI. Main Outcome Measures: Incidence of death, myocardial infarction, or repeat revascularization by 6 months and death by 12 months after enrollment. Results: At 6 months, death occurred in 1.4% of patients in the heparin plus Gp IIb/ IIIa group and in 1.0% of patients in the bivalirudin group (hazard ratio [HR], 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-1.14; P = .15). Myocardial infarction occurred in 7.4% and 8.2% of patients, respectively (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.93-1.34; P = .24), and repeat revascularization was required in 11.4% and 12.1% of patients, respectively (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.91-1.23; P = .45). By 1 year, death occurred in 2.46% of patients treated with heparin plus Gp IIb/IIIa blockade and in 1.89% of patients treated with bivalirudin (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.55-1.11; P = .16). Nonsignificant trends toward lower 1-year mortality with bivalirudin were present in all patient subgroups analyzed and were of greatest magnitude among high-risk patients. Conclusion: Long-term clinical outcome with bivalirudin and provisional Gp IIb/IIIa blockade is comparable with that of heparin plus planned Gp IIb/IIIa inhibition during contemporary PCI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)696-703
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume292
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 11 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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