Lipoprotein lipase gene mutations, plasma lipid levels, progression/regression of coronary atherosclerosis, response to therapy, and future clinical events: Lipoproteins and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study

Karandeep Sing, Christie M. Ballantyne, Laura Ferlic, Ramon Brugada, Ian Cushman, J. Kay Dunn, J. Alan Herd, Henry J. Pownall, Antonio M. Gotto, Ali J. Marian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Mutations in human lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene are potential risk factors for susceptibility to coronary artery disease (CAD). The objectives of this study were to determine the influence LPL mutations Asn291Ser and Ser447Ter on plasma lipid levels, regression and progression of CAD, clinical events rate, and response to fluvastatin therapy in the Lipoprotein and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study (LCAS) population. LCAS is a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study designed to test the influence of fluvastatin on progression or regression of CAD. The Asn291Ser and Ser447Ter genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme digestion. Fasting plasma lipid profiles were measured and quantitative coronary angiography was performed at baseline and 2.5 years following randomization. Fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular events during the follow-up period were recorded. A total of 4% (14/363) and 18% (62/352) of the subjects had the Asn291Ser and Ser447Ter mutations, respectively. Overall, there was no statistically association between the Asn291Ser and Ser447Ter mutations and the baseline or final mean plasma levels of lipids, number of coronary lesions, total occlusions, the mean minimal lumen diameter (MLD) stenoses and the clinical events rate. However, patients with the Ser447Ter variant had a slightly higher baseline high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) level (46.2 ± 12 vs 43.2 ± 11, P = 0.057), less increase in plasma HDL levels in response to fluvastatin therapy (3 vs 11%, P = 0.056) and a higher cardiovascular events rate (23 vs 13%, P = 0.056). Thus, the Ser447Ter variant had a modest influence on plasma HDL levels and the rate of cardiovascular events. These changes were of borderline statistical significance. Neither the Ser447Ter nor the Asn291Ser mutation had a major impact on susceptibility to CAD, progression or regression of CAD, clinical events rate or response to fluvastatin therapy in LCAS population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)435-442
Number of pages8
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume144
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1999

Keywords

  • Coronary artery disease
  • Genetics
  • Lipoprotein lipase
  • Mutation
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Risk factor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Lipoprotein lipase gene mutations, plasma lipid levels, progression/regression of coronary atherosclerosis, response to therapy, and future clinical events: Lipoproteins and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this