Latent infection as a source of disseminated disease caused by organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques

Joel N. Maslow, Indira Brar, Gary Smith, Gale W. Newman, Reshma Mehta, Charles Thornton, Peter Didier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Whether infection with Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) among patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome results from recent exposure to virulent strains or reactivation of latent infection acquired years earlier is unknown. To address this question, tissue samples from 47 simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected and 63 SIV-uninfected rhesus macaques were cultured. MAC was cultured from 14 SIV-uninfected macaques (22.2%) and 32 SIV-infected macaques (68.1%); median bacterial burdens were 33.3 and 998.7 cfu/g, respectively. Genetically distinct strains of MAC were identified for 13 SIV-uninfected macaques (20.6%) and 15 SIV-infected macaques (31.9%). A genetically identical MAC strain (K128A) was identified for 25 SIV-infected macaques (53.2%) and 1 SIV-uninfected macaque (1.6%). Multivariate analysis identified infection with SIV/DeltaB670, diagnosis of an SIV-related tumor or opportunistic infection, and birth on site as risks for MAC infection. SIV-uninfected and SIV-infected macaques yielding unique strains of MAC were considered to have latent and reactivation infection, respectively, whereas animals infected with strain K128A were considered to have recent infection, demonstrating that both mechanisms occur among rhesus macaques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1748-1755
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Infectious Diseases
Volume187
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2003

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Infectious Diseases

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