Laboratory diagnostics, phylogenetic analysis and clinical outcome of a subcutaneous Mycoleptodiscus indicus infection in an immunocompetent cat

Grazieli Maboni, Paula Krimer, Rodrigo Baptista, Ana Lorton, Christina Anderson, Susan Sanchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Mycoleptodiscus indicus is a dematiaceous hyphomycete fungus found on plant leaves. It has been rarely reported as a cause of human or animal disease, possibly because it is difficult to culture and identify from clinical specimens. Infections are presumably acquired by traumatic implantation. Case presentation: An 8-year-old non-immunosuppressed cat from Georgia, USA, presented with a left front leg swelling without lameness. Cytology from a fine needle aspirate revealed pyogranulomatous inflammation with both cytoplasmic and extracellular fungal elements. There were septate hyphae with irregularly sized segments, non-staining uneven walls, and rounded yeast-like forms from which longer hyphae arose in a hub-and-spoke pattern. A mold was isolated on agar from a fine needle aspirate collected 1 week later and identified as M. indicus by morphology, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. The cat recovered completely and uneventfully with antifungal treatment. Conclusions: We report a previously undescribed presentation of M. indicus causing a subcutaneous infection in a cat with successful antifungal treatment. In this study we highlight the potential of M. indicus to infect immunocompetent animals, and the veterinary medical community should be aware of its unusual but characteristic clinical, microbiological and cytologic presentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number354
JournalBMC Veterinary Research
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 21 2019

Keywords

  • Cytology
  • Feline
  • Fungal culture
  • Mycoleptodiscus indicus
  • Phylogenetic analysis
  • Subcutaneous infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • veterinary(all)

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