Knee kinematics in genesis total knee arthroplasty. A comparison of different tibial designs with and without posterior cruciate substitution in cadaveric specimens.

Stephen J. Incavo, B. D. Beynnon, C. C. Johnson, D. L. Churchill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Knee joint kinematics after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are not well understood. This study measured knee kinematics before and after TKA in six cadaveric specimens. Different tibial surface contours (standard, flat, and dished) and slopes (10 degrees and 15 degrees) with the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) intact as well as a posterior-stabilized design were studied. The anteroposterior and proximal-distal displacements of the tibia relative to the femur were measured during active knee extension. For the standard design, it was possible to restore the normal position of the tibia relative to the femur at 90 degrees of flexion to within 2 mm; however, restoration of the tibiofemoral position was not achieved with the knee in the extended position. At 90 degrees of flexion, all of the TKA components resulted in a posteriorly positioned tibia compared with the normal knee. The standard, flat, and dished components shifted the tibia into a proximal position compared with the normal knee, while the 15 degrees and posterior-stabilized components shifted the tibia distally. With the knee in the extended position, the standard, flat, dished, and posterior-stabilized designs placed the tibia posteriorly and proximally compared with the normal position of the tibia relative to the femur. The 10 degrees and 15 degrees sloped components placed the tibia in a more anterior position. Of the PCL-retaining designs tested, the 10 degrees sloped tibial component produced the closest to normal knee kinematics. Overall, normal kinematic behavior of the knee was not restored after TKA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)209-215
Number of pages7
JournalThe American journal of knee surgery
Volume10
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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