INTRAVENOUS INFUSION OF CONTAMINATED DEXTROSE SOLUTION. The Devonport Incident

P. D. Meers, M. W. Calder, M. M. Mazhar, G. M. Lawrie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The manufacture, faulty sterilisation, distribution, and use of part of a batch of 5% dextrose intravenous solution is described. Some of the bottles were bacterially contaminated, and the contents of some of these were infused into patients. Certain details of the patients affected, at least four of whom died of acute endotoxic shock, are recorded. The multiplication of three of the organisms isolated from the bottles was followed experimentally in dextrose solution, and the resulting endotoxin levels were estimated. At room temperature in this fluid gram-negative species of bacteria reached counts of about 107 organisms per ml. in 3 weeks, falling slowly to 104-105 per ml. after 11 months. These findings accorded well with counts found in contaminated bottles of the same age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1189-1192
Number of pages4
JournalThe Lancet
Volume302
Issue number7839
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 24 1973

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'INTRAVENOUS INFUSION OF CONTAMINATED DEXTROSE SOLUTION. The Devonport Incident'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this