Interpersonal violence and mental health outcomes among Asian American and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander college students

Olga G. Archambeau, B. Christopher Frueh, Aimee N. Deliramich, Jon D. Elhai, Anouk L. Grubaugh, Steve Herman, Bryan S.K. Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

In a cross-sectional survey of college students (N = 614), we studied interpersonal violence victimization, perpetration, and mental health outcomes in an ethnoracially diverse rural-based sample of Asian Americans (27) and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islanders (25), two groups vastly underrepresented in trauma research. High rates of interpersonal violence (34), violence perpetration (13), and probable psychiatric diagnoses (77), including posttraumatic stress disorder, were found. Exposure to physical violence, sexual violence, and life stress all were predictive of psychopathology. Female participants were associated with higher likelihood of sexual violence victimization compared to male participants, and Asian American status (especially among males) was associated with lower likelihood of physical and sexual violence compared with European Americans. These data enhance our understanding of interpersonal violence and mental health outcomes among previously understudied minority groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)273-283
Number of pages11
JournalPsychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
Volume2
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2010

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • health disparities
  • interpersonal violence
  • posttraumatic stress disorder
  • rural
  • trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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