Interleukin 2 infusion induces haemopoietic growth factors and modifies marrow regeneration after chemotherapy or autologous marrow transplantation

Helen E. Heslop, Andrew S. Duncombe, Joyce E. Reittie, Concha Bello‐Fernandez, David J. Gottlieb, H. Grant Prentice, Atul B. Mehta, A. Victor Hoffbrand, Malcolm K. Brenner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Administration of interleukin 2 (IL2) to patients with minimal residual malignant disease following myelo-ablative chemo-radiotherapy may augment immune reconstitution and reduce the risk of relapse by increasing cytotoxic effector function and cytokine dependent killing directed at residual malignant cells. The ability of IL2 generated activated killer cells to inhibit haemopoietic progenitor cells and to release gamma-interferon (γIFN) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) may, however, retard haemopoietic recovery, as both TNF and γIFN inhibit normal myelopoiesis in vitro. To determine the effect of IL2 infusion on myeloid regeneration in vivo, we have examined haemopoietic recovery in patients receiving this cytokine following autologous marrow transplantation or ablative chemotherapy. We find that IL2 infusion accelerates neutrophil recovery and that granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GMCSF) and IL3 mRNA become detectable in circulating mononuclear cells. Induction of TNF by IL2 may also contribute to subsequent acceleration of myelopoiesis by initiation of GM-CSF mRNA synthesis in patient marrow fibroblasts. These results show that IL2 infusion may facilitate myeloid recovery when administered during the period of haemopoietic regeneration following ablative chemoradiotherapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)237-244
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Haematology
Volume77
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

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