Influenza virus infection in infants less than three months of age

Jeffrey M. Bender, Krow Ampofo, Per Gesteland, Xiaoming Sheng, Kent Korgenski, Bill Raines, Judy A. Daly, Karen Valentine, Rajendu Srivastava, Andrew T. Pavia, Carrie L. Byington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the presentation, outcomes, and the risk of serious bacterial infection (SBI) in infants <3 months old with influenza virus infection. PATIENTS AND Methods: We identified demographic, hospitalization, and microbiologic data from computerized medical records for all infants and children <24 months of age, with laboratory confirmed influenza infection cared for at a tertiary care children's hospital during 4 winter seasons (2004-2008). We compared those <3 months of age with older groups. Results: We identified 833 children <24 months of age with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Of those, 218 were <3 months old. Influenza accounted for 3.6% of all evaluations of febrile infants and 12% of febrile infant encounters during winter. Infants <3 months of age were less likely to have a high risk chronic medical condition, but were more likely to be hospitalized than children 3 to <24 months old (P < 0.005). Infants <3 months with influenza had fewer prolonged hospital stays than those 3 to <6 months old [P = 0.056; OR: 0.5 (0.24-1.0)] and 6 to <12 months old [P = 0.011; OR: 0.43 (0.24-0.83)]. Five (2.3%) infants <3 months old had SBI. Conclusions: Infants <3 months of age with influenza virus infection often present with fever alone. Although they are more likely to be hospitalized than those 3 to <24 months old, hospital stays are short and outcomes generally good. Infants with influenza virus infection have a low risk of concomitant SBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-9
Number of pages4
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

Keywords

  • Febrile infant
  • Flu
  • Maternal immunization
  • Outcomes
  • Serious bacterial infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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