Individuals' willingness to talk to their doctors about clinical trial enrollment

Katherine A. McComas, Zheng Yang, Geri K. Gay, John P. Leonard, Andrew J. Dannenberg, Hildy Dillon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study investigates whether perceived fairness of doctor-patient interactions relates to individuals' willingness to communicate with their doctors about clinical trial enrollment. It also explores how willingness to talk, the perceived fairness of interactions, and trust in doctors relate to intentions to participate in a future clinical trial. Results from a random digit dial (RDD) telephone survey of U.S. adults (N=500) measured respondents' willingness to talk to their doctors about clinical trials and intentions to participate in future trials. Perceived fairness of interactions and trust in doctors were associated with willingness to talk about clinical trials. A negative relationship emerged between perceived fairness of interactions and intentions to participate when willingness to talk was introduced into the equation. This relationship suggested that when respondents were more willing to talk to their doctors and perceived these discussions as fair, they were also less likely to express intentions to enroll in future trials. In turn, perceiving these interactions as less fair was related to greater intention to enroll. Fairness of interactions and trust in doctors were less relevant to respondents who were less willing to talk to their doctors; however, these respondents also were more likely to express intentions to enroll in future clinical trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)189-204
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Health Communication
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Library and Information Sciences

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