Increased Bloodstream Infection Rates in Surgical Patients Associated with Variation from Recommended Use and Care Following Implementation of a Needleless Device

Susan Temporado Cookson, Melanie Ihrig, Edward M. O'Mara, Mark Denny, Helen Volk, Shailen N. Banerjee, Alan I. Hartstein, William R. Jarvis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

67 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine if an apparent increase in bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with central venous catheters (CVCs) was associated with the implementation of a needleless access device. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study using a derived CVC-days factor for estimating appropriate denominator data. SETTING: A 350-bed urban, acute, tertiary-care hospital. METHODS: BSI surveillance data were obtained, and high-risk areas for BSIs were determined. A random 5% sample of medical records was used to estimate CVC days, and a cohort study was conducted to compare BSI rates before and during needleless device use. A survey was conducted of nursing needleless-device practices. RESULTS: The surgical intensive-care unit (SICU), the medical intensive-care unit, and the solid organ transplant unit (OTU) were identified as high-risk units. Using existing surveillance BSI data and the estimated CVC days, the catheter-related BSI rates in the high-risk surgical patients were significantly higher during the needleless-device period compared with the preneedleless-device period (SICU, 9.4 vs 5.0/1,000 CVC days; OTU, 13.6 vs 2.2/1,000 CVC days). A survey of the nurses revealed that 60% to 70% were maintaining the needleless devices correctly. CONCLUSION: We observed a significant increase in the BSI rate in two surgical units, SICU and OTU, associated with introduction of a needleless device. This increase occurred shortly after the needleless device was implemented and was associated with nurses' unfamiliarity with the device, and needless-device use and care practices different from the manufacturer's recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalInfection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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