Improving business IQ in medicine through mentorship and education

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Business intelligence in the field of medicine, particularly with physicians, has been an abstract concept at best with no objective metric. Furthermore, in many arenas, it was taboo for medical students, residents, and physicians to discuss the business and finances of their work for fear that it would interfere with their sacred duties as health care providers. There has been a substantial shift in this philosophy over the last few decades with the growth and evolution of the health care industry in the United States. In 2012, health care expenditures accounted for 17.2% of the United States Gross Domestic Product, averaging $8915 per person. The passage of the Affordable Care Act in March of 2010 sent a clear message to all that change is coming, and it is more important now than ever to have physician leaders whose skills and knowledge in business, management, and health care law rival their acumen within their medical practice. Students, residents, and fellows all express a desire to gain more business knowledge throughout their education and training, but many do not know where to begin or have access to programs that can further their knowledge. Whether you are an employed or private practice physician, academic or community based, improving your business intelligence will help you get a seat at the table where decisions are made and give you the skills to influence those decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of orthopaedic trauma
Volume28
Issue number9 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Keywords

  • business
  • education
  • health care
  • management
  • orthopaedic trauma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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