Implementing and Disseminating an Evidence-Based Program to Prevent Falls in Older Adults, Texas, 2007-2009

Marcia G. Ory, Matthew Lee Smith, Angie Wade, Chelsea Mounce, Ashley Wilson, Reuben Parrish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction Falls are a public health problem for the growing population of older adults. We describe a statewide effort to implement and disseminate A Matter of Balance/Volunteer Lay Leader model, an evidence-based fall- prevention program. Methods We analyzed 2 secondary databases: 1) a centralized administrative data set to document implementation processes and structures for delivering the program and 2) a common set of outcome measures for assessing the effect of the program on older Texans. We used multivariate analyses to examine changes on key outcome variables, controlling for major covariates. Results From 2007 through 2009, we reached 3,092 older Texas residents. Program capacity was built by certifying 98 master trainers and 402 lay leaders and delivering the program in 227 classes through the Area Agency on Aging network. Immediate outcome results were positive, which indicates a pathway to promote more successful aging: 1) increases in falls efficacy, 2) improvements in overall physical activity levels, and 3) reductions in interference with everyday normal routines. Conclusion Widespread dissemination of a program to prevent falls can promote active aging among people who would otherwise be at risk for a downward cycle of health and functionality. Creating partnerships among different delivery sectors is needed for building community infrastructure to enhance the health of older adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA130
JournalPreventing Chronic Disease
Volume7
Issue number6
StatePublished - 2010

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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