Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on American College of Surgeons–Accredited Education Institutes & American Society of Anesthesiologists–Simulation Education Network: Opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration

Gordon G. Wisbach, Kathleen A. Johnson, Catherine Sormalis, Amy Johnson, Jennifer Ham, Patrice G. Blair, Steven Houg, Amanda R. Burden, Elizabeth H. Sinz, Sally A. Fortner, Randolph H. Steadman, Ajit K. Sachdeva, Deborah M. Rooney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic presented challenges for simulation programs including American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes and American Society of Anesthesiologists Simulation Education Network. American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes and American Society of Anesthesiologists Simulation Education Network leadership were surveyed to identify opportunities to enhance patient safety through simulation. Methods: Between January and June 2021, surveys consisting of 3 targeted domains: (I) Changing practice; (II) Contributions and recognition; and (III) Moving ahead were distributed to 100 American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes and 54 American Society of Anesthesiologists Simulation Education Network centers. Responses were combined and percent frequencies reported. Results: Ninety-six respondents, representing 51 (51%) American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes, 17 (31.5%) American Society of Anesthesiologists Simulation Education Network, and 28 dually accredited centers, completed the survey. Change of practice. Although 20.3% of centers stayed fully operational at the COVID-19 onset, 82% of all centers closed: 32% were closed less than 3 months, 28% were closed 3 to 6 months, 8% were closed 7 to 9 months, and 32% remained closed as of June 6, 2021. Most impacted activities were large-group instruction and team training. Sixty-nine percent of programs converted in-person to virtual programs. Contributions. The top reported innovative contributions included policies (80%), curricula (80%), and scholarly work (74%), Moving ahead. The respondents’ top concerns were returning to high-quality training to best address learners’ deficiencies and re-engagement of re-directed training programs. When asked “How the American College of Surgeons/American Society of Anesthesiologists Programs could best assist your simulation center goals?” the top responses were “facilitate collaboration” and “publish best practices from this work.” Conclusion: The Pandemic presented multiple challenges and opportunities for simulation centers. Opportunities included collaboration between American College of Surgeons Accredited Education Institutes and the American Society of Anesthesiologists Simulation Education Network to identify best practices and resources needed to enhance patient safety through simulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1330-1336
Number of pages7
JournalSurgery (United States)
Volume172
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2022

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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