Impact of an inferior vena cava filter retrieval algorithm on filter retrieval rates in a cancer population

Robert J. Litwin, Steven Y. Huang, Sharjeel H. Sabir, Quoc B. Hoang, Kamran Ahrar, Judy Ahrar, Alda L. Tam, Armeen Mahvash, Joe E. Ensor, Michael Kroll, Sanjay Gupta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective Our primary purpose was to assess the impact of an inferior vena cava filter retrieval algorithm in a cancer population. Because cancer patients are at persistently elevated risk for development of venous thromboembolism (VTE), our secondary purpose was to assess the incidence of recurrent VTE in patients who underwent filter retrieval. Methods Patients with malignant disease who had retrievable filters placed at a tertiary care cancer hospital from August 2010 to July 2014 were retrospectively studied. A filter retrieval algorithm was established in August 2012. Patients and referring physicians were contacted in the postintervention period when review of the medical record indicated that filter retrieval was clinically appropriate. Patients were classified into preintervention (August 2010-July 2012) and postintervention (August 2012-July 2014) study cohorts. Retrieval rates and clinical pathologic records were reviewed. Results Filter retrieval was attempted in 34 (17.4%) of 195 patients in the preintervention cohort and 66 (32.8%) of 201 patients in the postintervention cohort (P <.01). The median time to filter retrieval in the preintervention and postintervention cohorts was 60 days (range, 20-428 days) and 107 days (range, 9-600 days), respectively (P =.16). In the preintervention cohort, 49 of 195 (25.1%) patients were lost to follow-up compared with 24 of 201 (11.9%) patients in the postintervention cohort (P <.01). Survival was calculated from the date of filter placement to death, when available. The overall survival for patients whose filters were retrieved was longer compared with the overall survival for patients whose filters were not retrieved (P <.0001). Of the 80 patients who underwent successful filter retrieval, two patients (2.5%) suffered from recurrent VTE (n = 1 nonfatal pulmonary embolism; n = 1 deep venous thrombosis). Both patients were treated with anticoagulation without filter replacement. Conclusions Inferior vena cava filter retrieval rates can be significantly increased in patients with malignant disease with a low rate (2.5%) of recurrent VTE after filter retrieval.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-697
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery: Venous and Lymphatic Disorders
Volume5
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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