Immunochemical analysis of the glucocorticoid receptor: Identification of a third domain separate from the steroid-binding and DNA-binding domains

J. Carlstedt-Duke, S. Okret, O. Wrange, J. A. Gustafsson

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104 Scopus citations

Abstract

The glucocorticoid-receptor complex can be subdivided into three separate domains by limited proteolysis with trypsin or α-chymotrypsin. The following characteristics can be separated: steroid-binding activity (domain A), DNA-binding activity (domain B), and immunoactivity (domain C). We have previously reported the separation of the steroid-binding domain from the DNA-binding domain by limited proteolysis of the receptor with trypsin. In this paper, we report the detection by immunochemical analysis of a third domain of the glucocorticoid receptor, which does not bind hormone. Immunoactivity was detected by using specific antiglucocorticoid receptor antibodies raised in rabbits against purified rat liver glucocorticoid receptor and the assay used was an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. After digestion with α-chymotrypsin, the immunoactive region of the receptor (domain C) was separated from the other two domains (A and B). The immunoactive fragment was found to have a Stokes radius of 2.6 nm. Further digestion with α-chymotrypsin resulted in separation of the immunoactive fragment to give a fragment having a Stokes radius of 1.4 nm. The immunoactive domain could be separated from the half of the glucocorticoid receptor containing the steroid-binding and the DNA-binding domains (Stokes radius, 3.3 nm), by limited proteolysis of the receptor by α-chymotrypsin followed by gel infiltration or chromatography on DNA-cellulose.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4260-4264
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume79
Issue number14 I
DOIs
StatePublished - 1982

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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