Imaging atherosclerosis with hybrid [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography imaging: What Leonardo da Vinci could not see

Myra S. Cocker, Brian Mc Ardle, J. David Spence, Cheemun Lum, Robert R. Hammond, Deidre C. Ongaro, Matthew A. McDonald, Robert A. Dekemp, Jean Claude Tardif, Rob S.B. Beanlands

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

48 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prodigious efforts and landmark discoveries have led toward significant advances in our understanding of atherosclerosis. Despite significant efforts, atherosclerosis continues globally to be a leading cause of mortality and reduced quality of life. With surges in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes, atherosclerosis is expected to have an even more pronounced impact upon the global burden of disease. It is imperative to develop strategies for the early detection of disease. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging utilizing [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) may provide a non-invasive means of characterizing inflammatory activity within atherosclerotic plaque, thus serving as a surrogate biomarker for detecting vulnerable plaque. The aim of this review is to explore the rationale for performing FDG imaging, provide an overview into the mechanism of action, and summarize findings from the early application of FDG PET imaging in the clinical setting to evaluate vascular disease. Alternative imaging biomarkers and approaches are briefly discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1211-1225
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Nuclear Cardiology
Volume19
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Calcification
  • Computed tomography
  • Inflammation
  • Positron emission tomography
  • Vulnerable plaque
  • [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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