IL-12 gene-modified bone marrow cell therapy suppresses the development of experimental metastatic prostate cancer

H. Wang, G. Yang, T. L. Timme, T. Fujita, K. Naruishi, A. Frolov, Malcolm Brenner, D. Kadmon, T. C. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

To investigate the immunomodulatory effects of interleukin-12 (IL-12) for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer, we administered adult bone marrow cells (BMC) that were genetically modified by retroviral vector-mediated IL-12 gene transduction in an experimental mouse model of prostate cancer metastasis. This therapy produced significant anti-metastatic effects in bone and lung and prolonged animal survival. Flow cytometric analysis indicated donor BMC could effectively home to bone and lung after treatment. Intensive infiltration of CD4 and CD8T cells in lung metastases and increased systemic natural killer and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activities indicated induction of a significant anti-metastatic immune response after treatment with IL-12 transduced BMC. Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of gene-modified BMC gene therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-827
Number of pages9
JournalCancer Gene Therapy
Volume14
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2007

Keywords

  • Bone marrow cells
  • Cancer vaccination
  • Gene therapy
  • IL-12
  • Metastasis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cancer Research

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