Identification of circulating tumor cells using 4-color fluorescence in situ hybridization: Validation of a noninvasive aid for ruling out lung cancer in patients with low-dose computed tomography–detected lung nodules

Ruth L. Katz, Tanweer M. Zaidi, Deep Pujara, Namita D. Shanbhag, Duy Truong, Shekhar Patil, Reza J. Mehran, Randa A. El-Zein, Sanjay S. Shete, Joshua D. Kuban

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Approximately one third of needle biopsies that are performed to rule out malignancy of indeterminate pulmonary nodules detected radiologically during lung cancer screening are negative, thus exposing cancer-free patients to risks of pneumothorax, bleeding, and infection. A noninvasive confirmatory tool (eg, liquid biopsy) is urgently needed in the lung cancer diagnosis setting to stratify patients who should receive biopsy versus those who should be monitored. Methods: A novel antigen-independent, 4-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based method was developed to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) with abnormalities in gene copy numbers in mononuclear cell–enriched peripheral blood samples from patients with (n = 107) and without (n = 100) lung cancer. Results: Identification of CTCs using FISH probes at 10q22.3/CEP10 and 3p22.1/3q29 detected lung cancer cases with 94.2% accuracy, 89% sensitivity, and 100% specificity compared with biopsy. Conclusion: The high accuracy of this liquid biopsy method suggests that it may be used as a noninvasive decision tool to reduce the frequency of unnecessary needle biopsy in patients with benign pulmonary lesions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)553-562
Number of pages10
JournalCancer cytopathology
Volume128
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2020

Keywords

  • CTC
  • FISH
  • LDCT screening
  • indeterminate lung nodules
  • lung cancer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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