Human B cell growth factors overcome T cell-mediated inhibition of specific antibody production: A possible mechanism for the exacerbation of autoimmune disease

Malcolm Brenner, M. E. North

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Under normal circumstances, antigen-dependent antibody production in man requires autologous T cells, B cells and macrophages. If allogeneic T cells are substituted, then antibodies are not synthesized, due to the development of inhibitory interactions. Addition of B cell growth and differentiation factors change this pattern of response, and allow antibodies to be produced even when allogeneic T cells are the source of help. There is evidence that such B cell growth factors are released during most normal immune responses: we suggest that their ability to allow B cells to escape from inhibitory interactions and secrete antibodies, may underlie the observed exacerbation of certain autoimmune diseases by intercurrent infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)635-640
Number of pages6
JournalClinical and Experimental Immunology
Volume52
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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