How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Study Using Systematic Review and Survey Design

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bita A. Kash, Juha Baek, Ohbet Cheon, Joanna Grace Mayo Manzano, Stephen L. Jones, Jaya Paranilam, Robert A. Phillips

Although various interventions targeted at reducing hospital readmissions have been identified in the literature, little is known about actual operationalization of such evidence-based interventions. This study conducted a systematic review and a survey of key informants in 2 leading hospitals, Houston Methodist (HM) and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), to compare and contrast the most cited evidence-based interventions in the current literature with interventions reported by those hospitals. The authors found that both hospitals followed evidence-based practices reported as successful in the literature. Both hospitals have implemented interventions for inpatient settings, and the timing of interventions was very similar. Major implementation differences observed for post-discharge interventions focused on collaboration. It also was found that HM was more likely than MDACC to use medication reconciliation in outpatient (P =.018) and discharge planning for community/home patients (P =.032). Results will provide hospital professionals with insights for implementing the most effective interventions to reduce readmissions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

PMID: 30714387

Altmetrics

Cite this

Standard

How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies : A Mixed-Methods Comparative Study Using Systematic Review and Survey Design. / Kash, Bita A.; Baek, Juha; Cheon, Ohbet; Manzano, Joanna Grace Mayo; Jones, Stephen L.; Paranilam, Jaya; Phillips, Robert A.

In: American Journal of Medical Quality, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Kash, BA, Baek, J, Cheon, O, Manzano, JGM, Jones, SL, Paranilam, J & Phillips, RA 2019, 'How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Study Using Systematic Review and Survey Design' American Journal of Medical Quality. https://doi.org/10.1177/1062860618824410

APA

Kash, B. A., Baek, J., Cheon, O., Manzano, J. G. M., Jones, S. L., Paranilam, J., & Phillips, R. A. (2019). How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Study Using Systematic Review and Survey Design. American Journal of Medical Quality. https://doi.org/10.1177/1062860618824410

Vancouver

Kash BA, Baek J, Cheon O, Manzano JGM, Jones SL, Paranilam J et al. How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Study Using Systematic Review and Survey Design. American Journal of Medical Quality. 2019 Jan 1. https://doi.org/10.1177/1062860618824410

Author

Kash, Bita A. ; Baek, Juha ; Cheon, Ohbet ; Manzano, Joanna Grace Mayo ; Jones, Stephen L. ; Paranilam, Jaya ; Phillips, Robert A. / How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies : A Mixed-Methods Comparative Study Using Systematic Review and Survey Design. In: American Journal of Medical Quality. 2019.

BibTeX

@article{e92d4925962e4ebcbe16bd00de6b5bb4,
title = "How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies: A Mixed-Methods Comparative Study Using Systematic Review and Survey Design",
abstract = "Although various interventions targeted at reducing hospital readmissions have been identified in the literature, little is known about actual operationalization of such evidence-based interventions. This study conducted a systematic review and a survey of key informants in 2 leading hospitals, Houston Methodist (HM) and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), to compare and contrast the most cited evidence-based interventions in the current literature with interventions reported by those hospitals. The authors found that both hospitals followed evidence-based practices reported as successful in the literature. Both hospitals have implemented interventions for inpatient settings, and the timing of interventions was very similar. Major implementation differences observed for post-discharge interventions focused on collaboration. It also was found that HM was more likely than MDACC to use medication reconciliation in outpatient (P =.018) and discharge planning for community/home patients (P =.032). Results will provide hospital professionals with insights for implementing the most effective interventions to reduce readmissions.",
keywords = "comparative study, evidence-based interventions, hospital readmissions, survey",
author = "Kash, {Bita A.} and Juha Baek and Ohbet Cheon and Manzano, {Joanna Grace Mayo} and Jones, {Stephen L.} and Jaya Paranilam and Phillips, {Robert A.}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1062860618824410",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "American Journal of Medical Quality",
issn = "1062-8606",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - How Leading Hospitals Operationalize Evidence-Based Readmission Reduction Strategies

T2 - American Journal of Medical Quality

AU - Kash, Bita A.

AU - Baek, Juha

AU - Cheon, Ohbet

AU - Manzano, Joanna Grace Mayo

AU - Jones, Stephen L.

AU - Paranilam, Jaya

AU - Phillips, Robert A.

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Although various interventions targeted at reducing hospital readmissions have been identified in the literature, little is known about actual operationalization of such evidence-based interventions. This study conducted a systematic review and a survey of key informants in 2 leading hospitals, Houston Methodist (HM) and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), to compare and contrast the most cited evidence-based interventions in the current literature with interventions reported by those hospitals. The authors found that both hospitals followed evidence-based practices reported as successful in the literature. Both hospitals have implemented interventions for inpatient settings, and the timing of interventions was very similar. Major implementation differences observed for post-discharge interventions focused on collaboration. It also was found that HM was more likely than MDACC to use medication reconciliation in outpatient (P =.018) and discharge planning for community/home patients (P =.032). Results will provide hospital professionals with insights for implementing the most effective interventions to reduce readmissions.

AB - Although various interventions targeted at reducing hospital readmissions have been identified in the literature, little is known about actual operationalization of such evidence-based interventions. This study conducted a systematic review and a survey of key informants in 2 leading hospitals, Houston Methodist (HM) and MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC), to compare and contrast the most cited evidence-based interventions in the current literature with interventions reported by those hospitals. The authors found that both hospitals followed evidence-based practices reported as successful in the literature. Both hospitals have implemented interventions for inpatient settings, and the timing of interventions was very similar. Major implementation differences observed for post-discharge interventions focused on collaboration. It also was found that HM was more likely than MDACC to use medication reconciliation in outpatient (P =.018) and discharge planning for community/home patients (P =.032). Results will provide hospital professionals with insights for implementing the most effective interventions to reduce readmissions.

KW - comparative study

KW - evidence-based interventions

KW - hospital readmissions

KW - survey

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061176930&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85061176930&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1062860618824410

DO - 10.1177/1062860618824410

M3 - Article

JO - American Journal of Medical Quality

JF - American Journal of Medical Quality

SN - 1062-8606

ER -

ID: 45692551