Hostility and hope in combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder: A look back at combat as compared to today

J. Jeffrey Crowson, B. Christopher Frueh, C. R. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thirty-seven male veterans with combat-related PTSD completed measures of hostile automatic thoughts, hope, and positive and negative affect. Responses to the items of each measure were presented in two formats: (a) the veteran's feelings today and (b) (on a separate form) how he felt while in combat. Veterans reported significantly higher levels of hostility and negative affect in combat as opposed to today. Contrary to predictions, high levels of both positive affect and automatic positive thoughts also were reported in combat relative to today. Hope levels varied primarily as a function of being employed rather than unemployed. The implications and limitations of this methodology and these findings for combat veterans and other groups are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)149-165
Number of pages17
JournalCognitive Therapy and Research
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2001

Keywords

  • cognitions
  • hope
  • hostility
  • military veterans
  • positive and negative affect
  • posttraumatic stress disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

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