Hospital length of stay and cost burden of HIV, tuberculosis, and HIV-tuberculosis coinfection among pregnant women in the United States

Adeola Falana, Vanessa Akpojiyovwi, Esther Sey, Andika Akpaffiong, Olive Agumbah, Samara Chienye, Jamie Banks, Erin Jones, Kiara K. Spooner, Jason L. Salemi, Omonike Olaleye, Sherri D. Onyiego, Hamisu M. Salihu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: We sought to determine hospital length of stay (LOS) and cost burden associated with hospital admissions among pregnant women with HIV monoinfection, tuberculosis (TB) monoinfection, or HIV-TB coinfection in the United States. Methods: Analysis covered the period from 2002-2014 using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Relevant ICD-9-CM codes were used to determine HIV and TB status. Costs associated with hospitalization were calculated and adjusted to 2010 dollars using the medical care component of the Consumer Price Index. Results: We found modest annual average reduction in HIV, TB, and HIV-TB coinfection rates over the study period. The mean LOS was lowest among mothers free of HIV or TB disease and highest among those with HIV-TB coinfection. The average LOS among mothers diagnosed with TB monoinfection was 60% higher than for those with HIV monoinfection. The cost associated with pregnancy-related hospital admissions among mothers with HIV was approximately 30% higher than disease-free mothers, and the cost more than doubled among patients with TB monoinfection or HIV-TB coinfection. Conclusions: TB significantly increased hospital care cost among HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Keywords

  • Cost burden
  • HIV-TB coinfection
  • Length of stay (LOS)
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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