Home telemonitoring platforms for adults with diabetes mellitus: A narrative review of literature

Julie Hammett, Farzan Sasangohar, Mark Lawley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Diabetes mellitus in adults is a global health burden affecting 382 million people and costing over $612 billion worldwide. Remote patient monitoring is often considered to be a technological solution to the challenges in healthcare delivery, yet many studies have shown mixed results or no effect on patient outcomes. A narrative review of literature was conducted to contribute to the field of technology-driven home healthcare delivery by analyzing the systems in context with the monitoring and intervention technologies. This review analyzed papers with home telemonitoring and intervention systems for adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Technologies used were differentiated into four categories: telephones, mobile devices, computers, and other Internet-connected devices. Our findings suggest no clear association between the type of technology used and the outcomes of the participants. Frequency of monitoring and intervention were distinguishable by diabctic outcome metrics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages508-512
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781510889538
DOIs
StatePublished - 2018
Event62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2018Oct 5 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
CountryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period10/1/1810/5/18

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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