High spatial correlation in brain connectivity between micturition and resting states within bladder-related networks using 7 T MRI in multiple sclerosis women with voiding dysfunction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Several studies have reported brain activations and functional connectivity (FC) during micturition using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and concurrent urodynamics (UDS) testing. However, due to the invasive nature of UDS procedure, non-invasive resting-state fMRI is being explored as a potential alternative. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing resting states as a non-invasive alternative for investigating the bladder-related networks in the brain. Methods: We quantitatively compared FC in brain regions belonging to the bladder-related network during the following states: ‘strong desire to void’, ‘voiding initiation (or attempt at voiding initiation)’, and ‘voiding (or continued attempt of voiding)’ with FC during rest in nine multiple sclerosis women with voiding dysfunction using fMRI data acquired at 7 T and 3 T. Results: The inter-subject correlation analysis showed that voiding (or continued attempt of voiding) is achieved through similar network connections in all subjects. The task-based bladder-related network closely resembles the resting-state intrinsic network only during voiding (or continued attempt of voiding) process but not at other states. Conclusion: Resting states fMRI can be potentially utilized to accurately reflect the voiding (or continued attempt of voiding) network. Concurrent UDS testing is still necessary for studying the effects of strong desire to void and initiation of voiding (or attempt at initiation of voiding).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalWorld Journal of Urology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Brain connectivity
  • Functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Resting states
  • Urodynamics
  • Voiding dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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