High-order interactions explain the collective behavior of cortical populations in executive but not sensory areas

Mircea I. Chelaru, Sarah Eagleman, Ariana R. Andrei, Russell Milton, Natasha Kharas, Valentin Dragoi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

One influential view in neuroscience is that pairwise cell interactions explain the firing patterns of large populations. Despite its prevalence, this view originates from studies in the retina and visual cortex of anesthetized animals. Whether pairwise interactions predict the firing patterns of neurons across multiple brain areas in behaving animals remains unknown. Here, we performed multi-area electrical recordings to find that 2nd-order interactions explain a high fraction of entropy of the population response in macaque cortical areas V1 and V4. Surprisingly, despite the brain-state modulation of neuronal responses, the model based on pairwise interactions captured ∼90% of the spiking activity structure during wakefulness and sleep. However, regardless of brain state, pairwise interactions fail to explain experimentally observed entropy in neural populations from the prefrontal cortex. Thus, while simple pairwise interactions explain the collective behavior of visual cortical networks across brain states, explaining the population dynamics in downstream areas involves higher-order interactions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3954-3961.e5
JournalNeuron
Volume109
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2021

Keywords

  • correlations
  • cortical circuits
  • cortical dynamics
  • entropy
  • monkey
  • neural populations
  • prefrontal cortex
  • sleep
  • visual cortex
  • wakefulness

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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