High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Anas Younes, David Jendiroba, Heike Engel, Susan Escudier, Ruth Katz, Maria A. Rodriguez, Debbie Hill, Fernando Cabanillas, Michael Andreeff

We studied the incidence of numerical chromosome 18 abnormalities in 107 patients with lymphoid malignancies by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a directly conjugated centromeric probe for chromosome 18. Samples were obtained by fine needle aspiration of diseased nodes, bone marrows or peripheral blood. Monosomy 18 was more common in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (43%), small lymphocytic lymphoma (28%), and follicular lymphomas (12.5%) than in diffuse lymphomas (5.3%; p < 0.01). Monosomy 18 was detected in 9.7-17.1% of the cells in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (background, 5.4%; 99% CI, 4.2%-6.6%) and in 8%-16.7% (median, 10%) of the cells in (CLL) (background, 3.4%; 99% CI, 2.5%-4.3%). All patients with monosomy 18 were found to have bone marrow involvement. Of all untreated patients who had disease involving the bone marrow, 32% were found to have monosomy 18. Trisomy 18 was detected in 3.6%-48.2% of the cells in NHL (background, 0.9%; 99% CI, 0.2%-1.6%) and was most common in diffuse large-cell lymphoma (34%) and follicular lymphomas (31%). None of the patients with small lymphocytic lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia had trisomy 18. There was no correlation between trisomy 18 and response to treatment or clinical presentation. In this study, monosomy 18 was observed frequently in patients with lymphoid malignancies that involve the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Our data suggest that important gene(s) located on chromosome 18 may be involved in homing of the malignant lymphocytes to the bone marrow and peripheral blood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-44
Number of pages6
JournalCancer Genetics and Cytogenetics
Volume77
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1994

PMID: 7923081

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High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement. / Younes, Anas; Jendiroba, David; Engel, Heike; Escudier, Susan; Katz, Ruth; Rodriguez, Maria A.; Hill, Debbie; Cabanillas, Fernando; Andreeff, Michael.

In: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, Vol. 77, No. 1, 01.10.1994, p. 39-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Younes, A, Jendiroba, D, Engel, H, Escudier, S, Katz, R, Rodriguez, MA, Hill, D, Cabanillas, F & Andreeff, M 1994, 'High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement' Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, vol. 77, no. 1, pp. 39-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/0165-4608(94)90146-5

APA

Younes, A., Jendiroba, D., Engel, H., Escudier, S., Katz, R., Rodriguez, M. A., ... Andreeff, M. (1994). High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement. Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics, 77(1), 39-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/0165-4608(94)90146-5

Vancouver

Younes A, Jendiroba D, Engel H, Escudier S, Katz R, Rodriguez MA et al. High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement. Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics. 1994 Oct 1;77(1):39-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/0165-4608(94)90146-5

Author

Younes, Anas ; Jendiroba, David ; Engel, Heike ; Escudier, Susan ; Katz, Ruth ; Rodriguez, Maria A. ; Hill, Debbie ; Cabanillas, Fernando ; Andreeff, Michael. / High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement. In: Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics. 1994 ; Vol. 77, No. 1. pp. 39-44.

BibTeX

@article{c5ba3c00180743cca1110fd0dcc01269,
title = "High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement",
abstract = "We studied the incidence of numerical chromosome 18 abnormalities in 107 patients with lymphoid malignancies by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a directly conjugated centromeric probe for chromosome 18. Samples were obtained by fine needle aspiration of diseased nodes, bone marrows or peripheral blood. Monosomy 18 was more common in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (43{\%}), small lymphocytic lymphoma (28{\%}), and follicular lymphomas (12.5{\%}) than in diffuse lymphomas (5.3{\%}; p < 0.01). Monosomy 18 was detected in 9.7-17.1{\%} of the cells in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (background, 5.4{\%}; 99{\%} CI, 4.2{\%}-6.6{\%}) and in 8{\%}-16.7{\%} (median, 10{\%}) of the cells in (CLL) (background, 3.4{\%}; 99{\%} CI, 2.5{\%}-4.3{\%}). All patients with monosomy 18 were found to have bone marrow involvement. Of all untreated patients who had disease involving the bone marrow, 32{\%} were found to have monosomy 18. Trisomy 18 was detected in 3.6{\%}-48.2{\%} of the cells in NHL (background, 0.9{\%}; 99{\%} CI, 0.2{\%}-1.6{\%}) and was most common in diffuse large-cell lymphoma (34{\%}) and follicular lymphomas (31{\%}). None of the patients with small lymphocytic lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia had trisomy 18. There was no correlation between trisomy 18 and response to treatment or clinical presentation. In this study, monosomy 18 was observed frequently in patients with lymphoid malignancies that involve the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Our data suggest that important gene(s) located on chromosome 18 may be involved in homing of the malignant lymphocytes to the bone marrow and peripheral blood.",
author = "Anas Younes and David Jendiroba and Heike Engel and Susan Escudier and Ruth Katz and Rodriguez, {Maria A.} and Debbie Hill and Fernando Cabanillas and Michael Andreeff",
year = "1994",
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day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0165-4608(94)90146-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "77",
pages = "39--44",
journal = "Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics",
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RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - High incidence of monosomy 18 in lymphoid malignancies that have bone marrow and peripheral blood involvement

AU - Younes, Anas

AU - Jendiroba, David

AU - Engel, Heike

AU - Escudier, Susan

AU - Katz, Ruth

AU - Rodriguez, Maria A.

AU - Hill, Debbie

AU - Cabanillas, Fernando

AU - Andreeff, Michael

PY - 1994/10/1

Y1 - 1994/10/1

N2 - We studied the incidence of numerical chromosome 18 abnormalities in 107 patients with lymphoid malignancies by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a directly conjugated centromeric probe for chromosome 18. Samples were obtained by fine needle aspiration of diseased nodes, bone marrows or peripheral blood. Monosomy 18 was more common in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (43%), small lymphocytic lymphoma (28%), and follicular lymphomas (12.5%) than in diffuse lymphomas (5.3%; p < 0.01). Monosomy 18 was detected in 9.7-17.1% of the cells in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (background, 5.4%; 99% CI, 4.2%-6.6%) and in 8%-16.7% (median, 10%) of the cells in (CLL) (background, 3.4%; 99% CI, 2.5%-4.3%). All patients with monosomy 18 were found to have bone marrow involvement. Of all untreated patients who had disease involving the bone marrow, 32% were found to have monosomy 18. Trisomy 18 was detected in 3.6%-48.2% of the cells in NHL (background, 0.9%; 99% CI, 0.2%-1.6%) and was most common in diffuse large-cell lymphoma (34%) and follicular lymphomas (31%). None of the patients with small lymphocytic lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia had trisomy 18. There was no correlation between trisomy 18 and response to treatment or clinical presentation. In this study, monosomy 18 was observed frequently in patients with lymphoid malignancies that involve the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Our data suggest that important gene(s) located on chromosome 18 may be involved in homing of the malignant lymphocytes to the bone marrow and peripheral blood.

AB - We studied the incidence of numerical chromosome 18 abnormalities in 107 patients with lymphoid malignancies by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using a directly conjugated centromeric probe for chromosome 18. Samples were obtained by fine needle aspiration of diseased nodes, bone marrows or peripheral blood. Monosomy 18 was more common in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (43%), small lymphocytic lymphoma (28%), and follicular lymphomas (12.5%) than in diffuse lymphomas (5.3%; p < 0.01). Monosomy 18 was detected in 9.7-17.1% of the cells in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (background, 5.4%; 99% CI, 4.2%-6.6%) and in 8%-16.7% (median, 10%) of the cells in (CLL) (background, 3.4%; 99% CI, 2.5%-4.3%). All patients with monosomy 18 were found to have bone marrow involvement. Of all untreated patients who had disease involving the bone marrow, 32% were found to have monosomy 18. Trisomy 18 was detected in 3.6%-48.2% of the cells in NHL (background, 0.9%; 99% CI, 0.2%-1.6%) and was most common in diffuse large-cell lymphoma (34%) and follicular lymphomas (31%). None of the patients with small lymphocytic lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia had trisomy 18. There was no correlation between trisomy 18 and response to treatment or clinical presentation. In this study, monosomy 18 was observed frequently in patients with lymphoid malignancies that involve the bone marrow and peripheral blood. Our data suggest that important gene(s) located on chromosome 18 may be involved in homing of the malignant lymphocytes to the bone marrow and peripheral blood.

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UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027944637&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0165-4608(94)90146-5

DO - 10.1016/0165-4608(94)90146-5

M3 - Article

VL - 77

SP - 39

EP - 44

JO - Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics

T2 - Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics

JF - Cancer Genetics and Cytogenetics

SN - 0165-4608

IS - 1

ER -

ID: 3317643