Helium beam shadowing for high spatial resolution patterning of antibodies on microstructured diagnostic surfaces

Eliedonna Cacao, Tim Sherlock, Azeem Nasrullah, Steven Kemper, Jennifer Knoop, Katerina Kourentzi, Paul Ruchhoeft, Gila E. Stein, Robert L. Atmar, Richard C. Willson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We have developed a technique for the high-resolution, self-aligning, and high-throughput patterning of antibody binding functionality on surfaces by selectively changing the reactivity of protein-coated surfaces in specific regions of a workpiece with a beam of energetic helium particles. The exposed areas are passivated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and no longer bind the antigen. We demonstrate that patterns can be formed (1) by using a stencil mask with etched openings that forms a patterned exposure, or (2) by using angled exposure to cast shadows of existing raised microstructures on the surface to form self-aligned patterns. We demonstrate the efficacy of this process through the patterning of anti-lysozyme, anti-Norwalk virus, and anti-Escherichia coli antibodies and the subsequent detection of each of their targets by the enzyme-mediated formation of colored or silver deposits, and also by binding of gold nanoparticles. The process allows for the patterning of three-dimensional structures by inclining the sample relative to the beam so that the shadowed regions remain unaltered. We demonstrate that the resolution of the patterning process is of the order of hundreds of nanometers, and that the approach is well-suited for high throughput patterning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9
Number of pages1
JournalBiointerphases
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

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