Heartburn risk factors, knowledge, and prevention strategies: A population-based survey of individuals with heartburn

Susan A. Oliveria, Paul J. Christos, Nicholas J. Talley, Andrew Dannenberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Twenty-five million adults experience heartburn daily. To target individuals for prevention programs, characteristics of persons with heartburn and the associated causes of this condition must first be identified. Methods: We conducted a population-based telephone survey of 2000 individuals with heartburn to describe the cause of the disease, knowledge of risk factors, and prevention strategies. Results: Lifestyle and work habits, and certain food and beverage consumption, were associated with heartburn. Women reported the onset of heartburn about 5 years later than men. Survey respondents were unaware of the risk factors for heartburn, and sex-dependent differences in knowledge were apparent. Logistic regression modeling identified increasing age, female sex, higher level of education, and frequent vs infrequent heartburn as significant (P<.02) predictors of whether patients told a physician about their heartburn symptoms. Increasing age, higher body mass index, and reduced level of education were significant (P<.02) predictors of frequent vs infrequent heartburn in this study population. Conclusion: The findings of this study provide a framework for the development of a heartburn prevention program based on lifestyle modification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1592-1598
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Internal Medicine
Volume159
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 26 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

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