Health disparities experienced by Black and Hispanic Americans with multiple myeloma in the United States: a population-based study

Samer Al Hadidi, Deepa Dongarwar, Hamisu M. Salihu, Rammurti T. Kamble, Premal Lulla, La Quisa C. Hill, George Carrum, Carlos A. Ramos, Helen E. Heslop, Saad Z. Usmani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Hispanics and non-Hispanic (NH)-Blacks continue to face numerous health disparities related to multiple myeloma (MM). We aimed to analyze trends of MM-related hospitalizations and incidence of in-hospital mortality with a 10-year cross-sectional analysis of inpatient hospitalizations. The prevalence of MM-related hospitalizations was higher in NH-Blacks compared to NH-Whites (476.0 vs. 305.6 per 100,000 hospitalizations, p <.001). MM-related in-hospital mortality was higher in Hispanics compared to NH-Whites and NH-Blacks (6.2 vs. 5.3%, p <.001). Using average annual percent change (AAPC), we found a statistically significant decline of in-hospital mortality among all MM patients except NH-Blacks (AAPC: −2.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) −4.7, 0.4, p =.47), who had the highest inpatient mortality in recent years. Multivariate analysis showed that NH-Blacks received fewer transplants, more blood product transfusions, fewer palliative care consults, less inpatient chemotherapy, and utilized more intensive care. Disparities in MM care for NH-Blacks and Hispanics continue to persist despite recent advancements in MM therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalLeukemia and Lymphoma
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Black Americans
  • disparities
  • health disparities
  • Hispanics
  • Multiple myeloma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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