Guidelines for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14: brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion.

Daniel K. Resnick, Tanvir F. Choudhri, Andrew T. Dailey, Michael W. Groff, Larry Khoo, Paul G. Matz, Praveen Mummaneni, William C. Watters, Jeffrey Wang, Beverly C. Walters, Mark N. Hadley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although conflicting reports have been presented in the literature regarding the utility of lumbar braces for the prevention of low-back pain, most Class III medical evidence suggests that these supports used prophylactically do not reduce the incidence of low-back pain or decrease the amount of time lost from work in the general working population. Among workers with a history of a back injury, their use appears to decrease the number of work days lost due to back pain. Lumbar braces appear to be an effective treatment for acute low-back pain in some populations. They do not appear to be effective in the chronic low-back pain population. If a brace is used, rigid braces offer some benefit over soft braces. There are no data to suggest that relief of low-back pain with preoperative external bracing predicts a favorable outcome following lumbar spinal fusion. No information is available on the benefit of bracing for improving fusion rates or clinical outcomes following instrumented lumbar fusion for degenerative disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)716-724
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of neurosurgery. Spine
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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