Geldanamycin and its analogue 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin lowers Bcr-Abl levels and induces apoptosis and differentiation of Bcr-Abl-positive human leukemic blasts

R. Nimmanapalli, E. O'Bryan, Kapil Bhalla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

237 Scopus citations

Abstract

HL-60/Bcr-Abl cells, with ectopic expression of p185 Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase (TK), and K562 cells, with endogenous expression of p210 Bcr-Abl TK, display a high degree of resistance against antileukemic drug-induced apoptosis (G. Fang et al., Blood, 96: 2246-2256, 2000). Present studies demonstrate that treatment with ansamycin antibiotic geldanamycin (GA), or its less toxic analogue 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG), induces cytosolic accumulation of cytochrome c and cleavage and activities of caspase-9 and caspase-3, triggering apoptosis of HL-60/Bcr-Abl and K562 cells. GA or 17-AAG down-regulated intracellular Bcr-Abl and c-Raf protein levels, as well as reduced Akt kinase activity. Similar to Raf-1, v-Src, and Her-2-neu, Bcr-Abl TK has chaperone association with heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90). By binding and inhibiting Hsp90, GA or 17-AAG treatment shifted the binding of Bcr-Abl from Hsp90 to Hsp70 and induced the proteasomal degradation of Bcr-Abl, because cotreatment with proteasome inhibitor PSC341 reduced both GA (or 17-AAG)-mediated down-regulation of Bcr-Abl levels and inhibited apoptosis of HL-60/Bcr-Abl and K562 cells. These data establish the in vitro activity of GA and 17-AAG against Bcr-Abl-positive leukemic cells and support the in vivo investigation of 17-AAG against Bcr-Abl-positive leukemias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1799-1804
Number of pages6
JournalCancer research
Volume61
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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