Functional mapping of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles from high-density surface EMG recordings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction and hypothesis: Knowledge of the innervation of pelvic floor and sphincter muscles is of great importance to understanding the pathophysiology of female pelvic floor dysfunctions. This report presents our high-density intravaginal and intrarectal electromyography (EMG) probes and a comprehensive innervation zone (IZ) imaging technique based on high-density EMG readings to characterize the IZ distribution. Methods: Both intravaginal and intrarectal probes are covered with a high-density surface electromyography electrode grid (8 × 8). Surface EMG signals were acquired in ten healthy women performing maximum voluntary contractions of their pelvic floor. EMG decomposition was performed to separate motor-unit action potentials (MUAPs) and then localize their IZs. Results: High-density surface EMG signals were successfully acquired over the vaginal and rectal surfaces. The propagation patterns of muscle activity were clearly visualized for multiple muscle groups of the pelvic floor and anal sphincter. During each contraction, up to 218 and 456 repetitions of motor units were detected by the vaginal and rectal probes, respectively. MUAPs were separated with their IZs identified at various orientations and depths. Conclusions: The proposed probes are capable of providing a comprehensive mapping of IZs of the pelvic floor and sphincter muscles. They can be employed as diagnostic and preventative tools in clinical practices.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1689-1696
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Urogynecology Journal
Volume27
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2016

Keywords

  • EMG
  • Electromyography
  • Innervation zone
  • Intrarectal
  • Intravaginal
  • Motor unit
  • Pelvic floor muscles
  • Probe

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Urology

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