Fibrinolytic response during exercise and epinephrine infusion in the same subjects

Wayne L. Chandler, Richard C. Veith, Gilbert W. Fellingham, Wayne C. Levy, Robert S. Schwartz, Manuel D. Cerqueira, Steven E. Kahn, Valerie G. Larson, Kevin C. Cain, James C. Beard, Itamar B. Abrass, John R. Stratton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

To determine whether exercise-induced increases in tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) were related to plasma epinephrine concentration during exercise, 14 healthy men (aged 24 to 62 years) were studied during epinephrine infusions (10, 25 and 50 ng/kg per min) and graded supine bicycle exercise, beginning at 33 W and increasing in 33-W increments until exhaustion. Plasma epinephrine, active and total t-PA, active plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1) and t-PA/PAI-I complex concentrations were measured at each exercise and infusion level. During epinephrine infusion, active and total t-PA levels increased linearly with the plasma epinephrine concentration (respective slopes [± SEM]of 0.062 ± 0.003 and 0.076 ± 0.003 pmol/ng epinephrine). During exercise, t-PA levels did not increase until plasma epinephrine levels increased, after which both active and total t-PA levels again increased linearly with the plasma epinephrine concentration, but at twice the rate observed with epinephrine infusion (0.131 ± 0.005 and 0.147 ± 0.005 pmol/ng, respectively). The t-PA level in blood was directly proportional to the plasma epinephrine concentration during both exercise and epinephrine infusion, suggesting that epinephrine release during exercise stimulates t-PA secretion. In these healthy subjects, active plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 and t-PA/PAI-1 complex levels were low (41 ± 11 and 21 ± 5 pmol/liter, respectively) and did not change significantly during exercise or epinephrine infusion. It is concluded that approximately 50% of the increase in t-PA during exercise is due to stimulated release of t-PA by epinephrine. Other factors, such as reduced hepatic clearance during exercise, must account for the remaining 50% of the increase in t-PA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1412-1420
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Fibrinolytic response during exercise and epinephrine infusion in the same subjects'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this