Family history of coronary heart disease and the incidence and progression of coronary artery calcification: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)

Arvind K. Pandey, Michael J. Blaha, Kavita Sharma, Juan Rivera, Matthew J. Budoff, Ron Blankstein, Mouaz Al-Mallah, Nathan D. Wong, Leslee Shaw, Jeffery Carr, Daniel O'Leary, Joao A.C. Lima, Moyses Szklo, Roger S. Blumenthal, Khurram Nasir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: We evaluated family history as a predictor of incident and progressive coronary artery calcium (CAC) using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Background: MESA is a multi-center prospective study of 6814 asymptomatic individuals. The relationship between family history of coronary heart disease (CHD) and CAC incidence or progression has not been described previously. Methods: A total of 5099 participants had detailed information about family history of CHD (late versus premature and parental versus sibling history). The mean time between CAC scans was 3.1±1.3 years. The association of late versus premature family history was assessed against CAC change using multivariate regression model adjusted for demographics and cardiac risk factors. Results: A family history of premature CHD was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.55 (p<0.01) for incident development of CAC after adjusting for risk factors and demographics. A premature family history was associated with 14.4 units (p<0.01) greater volume scores compared to those with no family history in similarly adjusted models by median regression analysis. A combined parental and sibling family history was associated with the greatest incidence and progression in demographic-adjusted models. Caucasians demonstrated the most consistent predictive relationship between family history of premature CHD and incidence (p<0.01) and progression (p<0.05) of CAC, though no significant interaction with ethnicity was noted. Conclusions: Family history of premature CHD is associated with enhanced development and progression of subclinical disease, independent of other risk factors, in a multiethnic, population-based study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-376
Number of pages8
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume232
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Keywords

  • Coronary calcium
  • Family history
  • Subclinical atherosclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Family history of coronary heart disease and the incidence and progression of coronary artery calcification: Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this