Factors Associated with College Women’s Personal and Parental Decisions to be Vaccinated Against HPV

Brittany L. Rosen, James M. Bishop, Skye McDonald, Kelly L. Wilson, Matthew Lee Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a public health concern because of its association with cancer. HPV vaccine rates among college students remains low. This is a critical catch-up age for individuals to receive the HPV vaccine and research shows parents still play a role in college students’ medical decision-making. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine factors related to college women making a solo decision to initiate the HPV vaccination in comparison to making a joint parent-daughter decision. Data collected using an internet-delivered questionnaire were analyzed from 799 college women who had initiated or completed the HPV vaccination. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to compare study variables on who decided the participant should be vaccinated (self-decision, parent-only decision, joint parent-daughter decision). Participants who were older (OR 1.68, p < 0.001) and sexually active (OR 4.97, p < 0.001) were significantly more likely to have made a solo decision to be vaccinated. Participants who completed the HPV vaccination (OR 0.33, p < 0.001) and those who talked with a parent about the HPV vaccine (OR 0.12, p < 0.001) were significantly less likely to have made a solo decision to be vaccinated. Findings indicate joint parent-daughter decisions may improve HPV vaccination cycle completion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1228-1234
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Community Health
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

Keywords

  • Cancer prevention
  • College
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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