Factor structure and convergent validity of the inventory of interpersonal problems in an inpatient setting

Amber L. Bush, Amee B. Patel, Jon G. Allen, Cayla Teal, David M. Latini, Thomas E. Ellis, Steven Herrera, B. Christopher Frueh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP32) is a self-report measure designed to be used in clinical settings to assess interpersonal difficulties. However, it has been exclusively used in either outpatient or non-clinical settings, and psychometric data concerning its use in inpatients are limited. The current study examined the factor structure and construct validity of the IIP-32, and ways to optimally use this measure with inpatients at a private hospital providing intensive treatment. The original eight-factor structure was a poor fit to the data, whereas a five-factor structure provided a somewhat better fit. Although the five factors (Nonassertive, Detached, Intrusive, Self-Sacrificing, and Socially Inhibited) demonstrated adequate internal consistency, reliability, and limited convergent validity, the IIP is ultimately useful insofar as it engages patients in collaborative self-awareness during intensive psychotherapeutically oriented treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)145-158
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Psychiatric Practice
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2012

Keywords

  • clinical utility
  • inpatient population
  • interpersonal processes
  • Inventory of Interpersonal Problems
  • psychometric evaluation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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