Evaluation of the predictive value of a clinical worsening definition using 2-year outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: A REVEAL registry analysis

Adaani E. Frost, David B. Badesch, Dave P. Miller, Raymond L. Benza, Leslie A. Meltzer, Michael D. McGoon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Time to clinical worsening has been proposed as a primary end point in clinical trials of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however, neither standardized nor validated definitions of clinical worsening across PAH trials exist. This study aims to evaluate a proposed definition of clinical worsening within a large prospective, observational registry of patients with PAH with respect to its value as a predictor of proximate (within 1 year) risk for subsequent major events (ie, death, transplantation, or atrial septostomy). Methods: We assessed overall 2-year survival and survival free from major events to determine the relationship between clinical worsening and major events among adults with hemodynamically defined PAH (N = 3,001). Freedom from clinical worsening was defined as freedom from worsening functional class (FC), a ≥ 15% reduction in 6-min walk distance (6MWD), all-cause hospitalization, or the introduction of parenteral prostacyclin analog therapy. Results: In the 2 years of follow-up, 583 patients died. Four hundred twenty-six died after a documented clinical worsening event, including FC worsening (n = 128), a ≥ 15% reduction in 6MWD (n = 118), all-cause hospitalization (n = 370), or introduction of a prostacyclin analog (n = 91). Patients who experienced clinical worsening had significantly poorer subsequent 1-year survival postworsening than patients who did not worsen (P<.001). Conclusions: Clinical worsening was highly predictive of subsequent proximate mortality in this analysis from an observational study. These results validate the use of clinical worsening as a meaningful prognostic tool in clinical practice and as a primary end point in clinical trial design.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1521-1529
Number of pages9
JournalCHEST
Volume144
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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